Here is the most recent picture of my eyes (taken just now).  Yesterday's long travel schedule didn't help very much.  As you can see, since my right eye can't fully close, due to the right side facial paralysis, it is very susceptible to getting dried out, and since ICU, that drying out has hurt my cornea and created a bit of a cloud on it, which impairs the vision.

Since I have no feeling in my right eye (or right side of my face for that matter), it gets very red and inflamed because I will often have small things in it (eyelashes or dust) which I don't know about and can't get out on my own since you really need two hands to work on your own eyes or at least a good, single view of them.  It's kind of a bad combination of issues, but thankfully Jay helps me with this, cleaning out my eye and putting in extra lubrication at least once a day (everyday for over 3 years now!).

From the beginning of my stroke, I thought "fixing" my eyes would be the easiest deficit to check off the list.  As life goes, things don't always turn out how we expect, and tomorrow will mark my third eye surgery.  I've already had two strabismus surgeries to bring my eyes back in alignment, though these have not corrected the double vision since the injury to the nerves that control my right eye movement was so severe.  Tomorrow's surgery will be totally different, though still performed at UCLA's wonderful Jules Stein Eye Institute.  This surgery will help lift up my right eyelid since its current droop blocks my vision.  To counterbalance the potential added exposure that this lift could cause to my eye, a small gold weight will be implanted in my eyelid which will hopefully give it an extra boost to fully close--which would help prevent many problems that result from it getting dried out.

I would love your prayers tomorrow as I undergo this outpatient surgery.  I guess since I've experienced several, much bigger surgeries, this one has seemed pretty minor, but it will be a surgery, nonetheless, and there is always a potential that things could turn out differently than expected.  I have a great amount of confidence in this new eye doctor, Dr. Goldberg, who is a specialist in these types of procedures.  Pray that his efforts would be successful and that any potential negative affects (even that the gold weight would make my eye puffy and hard to fully open) would not happen.  Jay will update on here tomorrow afternoon.